Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

GOVERNOR MARIO M. CUOMO
TALKS ABOUT JOHN EDWARDS AND
HOW TO BRING PEACE TO IRAQ

This interview aired on July 8, 2004.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): The political season has begun, almost officially. John Kerry isn’t yet the nominee, but he’s said he would like to run with John Edwards, a senator from North Carolina.

Let’s switch now to Willkie, Farr & Gallagher, the famous law firm in Manhattan, and its most illustrious partner, Mario Matthew Cuomo, the former governor of New York. Governor, what do you think of Kerry’s choice?

GOVERNOR MARIO CUOMO (M.C.): It’s a good one, for a lot of reasons. Edwards is obviously an excellent spokesperson, and that’s always useful. And of the four people in this race, he’s undoubtedly the most charming and most persuasive. He’s young. He has a young family. And he’s politically correct. He gets along with Kerry. And the polls indicate 64–65 percent of everybody—Democrats, Republicans—thinks it’s a good choice. I think it’s been better received than I expected it to be. I don’t see much to the negatives being hurled at him by the Republicans.

W.O.: Governor Mario Cuomo, before you came on the radio with us on this summer day, you were with your old staffer Tim Russert, who has done pretty well since he left your service in the Executive Chamber in Albany. What did you tell Russert? Did you give him all your good stuff?

M.C.: (laughter) No. He was talking about my book Why Lincoln Matters: Today More Than Ever, and he asked about Edwards. And I said to him about Edwards what I just said to you.

He also spent a lot of time on the attacks on Edwards: Republicans saying he has no experience. Well, that’s ridiculous. I’m not going to use the obvious contrast, and that is the contrast with

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