Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

INTERVIEW WITH MARIAN B. JAVITS
ON THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE
BIRTH OF SENATOR JACOB K. JAVITS

The widow of Senator Jacob K. Javits, Marian Javits is a
whirlwind force in her own right and a great supporter of
the arts. We aired this interview with her on May 17,
2004.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): There has been a relentlessly familiar and recurring theme in all my rants, raves, and preaching: “Where are the giants who once strode across our political landscape and walked the land?” On these two radio stations we have talked so often about Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mario Cuomo, Jack Kennedy, Adlai Stevenson, Pat Moynihan. We’ve looked at the current crop of politicians and politicos, and so often they come up short. They certainly don’t measure up to those mythic figures of a few decades ago, where once giants walked the land.

This is the month of May, in the springtime of the year 2004. And on the 17th of May, one of those giants would have been one hundred years old. It’s the hundredth birthday of a towering New Yorker, a great United States senator from the state of New York: Jacob K. Javits. With us from New York City is his wife, Marian Borros Javits. Marian Javits is today chair of the Jacob Javits Foundation. Marian Javits, you still miss him, don’t you? MARIAN JAVITS (M.J.): Oh, yes, I miss him. And what a delight it is to talk to you, Bill O’Shaughnessy. You were one of the early compatriots, despite perhaps your occasional allegiance to Democrats like Mario Cuomo, whom you adore. And you’ve always respected and understood Jock Whitney, Walter Thayer, Nelson Rockefeller, and Jack Javits. They were all the same kind of Republicans. And they really mattered because they were moderates about fiscal policy. They were also more interested in solving the problems of the poor. Therefore, on social issues they always

-230-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 700

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.