Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

STATE SENATOR JOE PISANI
TALKS ABOUT JEANINE PIRRO,
POLITICS, AND HIS NEW LIFE

Joe Pisani was a vivid and beguiling fellow who almost
went all the way to the top in New York state—until he
ran afoul of one Rudy Giuliani. After a colorful and
turbulent political career, he finally found some peace out
of the spotlight up in the Hudson Valley. We interviewed
him on August 19, 2005.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): The summer is winding down, and maybe it’s a good thing, for this has been a mean political season. We’re talking with one of New York state’s most beloved and best-known political figures, Joseph Raymond Pisani. We caught up with Senator Joe in the Hudson Valley, and we switch now to his redoubt high above the mighty river. Senator Joe, what are you doing these days?

SENATOR JOE PISANI (J.P.): I’m practicing law. And, thank God, I still have a lot of energy. I’m working hard every day, trying to right the wrongs and correct the injustices that come to my door.

W.O.: Joe Pisani, how old are you now?

J.P.: I’ll be seventy-six on August 31.

W.O.: Are you any the wiser for being seventy-six?

J.P.: Well, there is some truth to the statement that when you get a little older, you get a little wiser. But, I’m probably capable of making the same mistakes I’ve made in the past. (laughs)

W.O.: Joe Pisani, you’ve had your ups and downs in politics. You were a New Rochelle city councilman, a New York state senator; you were being touted in a lot of circles even for governor of New York, and you almost ran for Westchester County executive. Joe, do you know Jeanine Pirro?

J.P.: Oh, I know her very well, Bill. I have high regard for her. I’ve known her since she was up at Albany Law School.

-250-

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