Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

ROBERT J. GREY JR., PRESIDENT,
AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION

Frank Trotta, a former New Rochellean who is now based
in Greenwich, where he serves as an advisor to Lewis
Lehrman (the Rite Aid founder who ran for governor of
New York but lost to Mario Cuomo), called me up one day
and said, “You gotta get this guy Robert Grey in. Among
other things, he’s president of the American Bar
Association.” Upon our interviewing him on September 21,
2004, I found Grey to be not only a great lawyer but also
a great American with an inspiring story.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): It’s a perfectly splendid Indian Summer day, what the Brits would call a quite “brilliant” day.

And for the next forty-five minutes or so, while we’re in your care and keeping, we’re going to present a very attractive man. I wish we had a damned television camera operating today. He’s sent from Central Casting, I’m afraid. He is president of the American Bar Association, the number one lawyer in the whole damn republic. His name is Robert Grey Jr. He hails from Richmond, Virginia, and he is in the Golden Apple to talk to some folks from the Gannett Editorial Board and tell them what lawyers think about the great issues of the day. Then he’s going to address the Greenwich Bar Association, a very tony group, up the line a piece. Mr. President Grey, welcome to Westchester. ROBERT GREY (R.G.): Thank you, Bill. I’m delighted to be here.

W.O.: Is that how courtly lawyers dress in the South? You have a pinstriped suit, a pink shirt, and a pink tie.

R.G.: Well, it’s a beautiful day, and I thought I would look the way I feel. Pink. (laughter)

W.O.: Have you ever been to Westchester before, Mr. Grey?

R.G.: I have not. But I’m delighted to be here. The hospitality is fabulous, and I’m looking forward to the interview. Your reputation precedes you.

-268-

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