Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

JOHN SPICER

John Spicer is a highly respected hospital administrator
with a national reputation. He presides ably, to this day,
over Sound Shore Medical Center based in New Rochelle
and also sits on the board of the Westchester Medical
Center. We interviewed him on September 30, 2004.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY (W.O.): This is Bill O’Shaughnessy with a special edition of “Westchester Open Line.” We’re here live in our Westchester studios, flying airborne at 1460 on the right side of the dial and also at 93.5 on the FM.

For our guests today, we do a double hit. For the next fortyfive minutes while we are in your care and keeping, we’re going to be visiting with an individual I think is the essential—I can’t think of a better word—person in the entire southern Westchester region. He’s the president and CEO of the entity known as the Sound Shore Medical Center, John Spicer. Welcome, sir.

JOHN SPICER (J.S.): Thank you, Bill, it’s good to be here.

W.O.: My wife, Nancy Curry O’Shaughnessy, is crazy about your wife, Kathy Spicer. Will you thus trust me to conduct myself fairly and properly and objectively?

J.S.: Yes, but I have a little leverage, I think, so you better be nice.

W.O.: I have to go home tonight.

J.S.: You’re right.

W.O.: John Spicer, this is such a—I almost said a perilous time— maybe that’s not misapplied for health care and hospitals.

Do you remember Alec Norton?

J.S.: Oh, sure.

W.O.: He was your predecessor. A colorful, Runyonesque guy. When did you take over our hospital?

J.S.: I came aboard in July of 1988. And I really followed George Vecchione, but Alec was the man that both George and I had to live up to. His reputation (laughing) went far beyond the borders of New Rochelle.

W.O.: He was a pretty colorful guy, Alec Norton.

-286-

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