Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

DR. RICHARD ROCCO PISANO

Like everything else, the medical profession has changed a
lot in recent years. But there are still some dedicated
practitioners—healers—like Richard Pisano. We spoke
about him on September 24, 2004, at the Beckwithe
Point Club.

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the sixtieth-birthday celebration of a very special individual.

First of all, thank you to his remarkable and indispensable wife, Kathy Pisano, for this lovely party. She is essential to his practice, his career, and his life. He knows it, and so do we all!

There are all kinds of people here tonight: other doctors—his colleagues—city officials, relatives, in-laws, and even a few outlaws. So please humor me as I recount some things you may not know about Kathy’s husband.

He was born August 16, 1944, on the Feast of Saint Rocco. Saint Rocco, a Frenchman, traveled to Italy to win eternal glory through miraculous healings of people afflicted by the plague. Thus, the Church of Rome venerates his birthday for protection against disease. Dr. Richard Rocco Pisano is aptly named—for a healer and a saint.

Some of you first encountered him as a young man at Xavier, the famous Jesuit high school in Manhattan. After graduation, he returned to the Jesuits at Fordham when it was truly a great university, before they began publishing my books! He trained at the prestigious University of Bologna in Italy and interned at Fordham Hospital, St. Barnabas in New Jersey, and New Rochelle Hospital.

And the rest is history. In twenty-four years, he became the most respected general practitioner in southern Westchester and rose to president of the Medical Board of Sound Shore Medical Center, whose great president, John Spicer, is here and will confirm Dr. Pisano’s genius and dedication. But there’s more.

He’s essentially an ontologist. Now I know that’s a high-sounding word that doesn’t quite fit into all the disciplines, specialties, and

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