Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

FRÉDÉRIC FEKKAI AT LITTLE FLOWER
CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES

Frédéric Fekkai is the most famous hair stylist in America.
This dazzlingly handsome New Yorker is also a highly
successful entrepreneur and businessman. Frédéric has
mentored and encouraged hundreds of talented young
stylists and designers over the years. He’s also making his
mark as a philanthropist who seeks out obscure but
worthy charities for his blessing and imprimatur. Frédéric
and his spectacular wife, Shirin, are treasures of New
York. Here is how I introduced him at the Humanitarian
Award Dinner on June 8, 2005.

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Metropolitan Club and the Humanitarian Award Dinner of Little Flower Children and Family Services.

On behalf of Cornelia Guest and Carla Lawhon, our chairs; and Sigourney Weaver, Lorraine Bracco, and Heidi Klum, our honorary elders; we thank you for the generosity of your purse and the gift of your presence.

Little Flower Children and Family Services was founded seventyfive years ago in a small, obscure Brooklyn parish in the Bed-Stuy section, and Herb Stupp, its gifted CEO, is an old friend, a colleague, a TV journalist and producer. We welcome you on his behalf as well as the wonderful Grace LoGrande, our executive director; the chairman of the board, Father Patrick West; and your president, Doug Singer.

Little Flower operates a haven in Wading River for over a hundred youngsters from third to tenth grade who are ineligible for foster care. Most are from broken homes; some suffered from fetal alcohol syndrome; and all of them struggle with emotional problems. “Children who know the sound of gunfire before they ever hear the sound of an orchestra,” as former Governor Mario Cuomo once remarked. And for them, for these children no one wanted,

-321-

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