Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

THE ROBERT MERRILL POSTAL STATION

Robert Merrill was a familiar and beloved figure in our
home heath. The famous Metropolitan Opera baritone
loved New Rochelle. And his neighbors adored him—so
much so that they persuaded the U.S. Postal Service to
name the Wykagyl Branch Post Office in his honor. Mr.
Merrill made thousands of concert appearances all over
the world and countless television appearances. He also
found time to give Frank Sinatra “tune-up” voice lessons
over the long-distance telephone.

Among his proudest possessions was a Yankees jersey #
given to him by Billy Martin.

These are my remarks at the dedication of the post office
on June 2, 2008.

Marion Merrill: Bob’s accompanist, his partner, his muse, his beloved.

And Nita Lowey, our superb and inexhaustible congresswoman. She has become a ranking “cardinal” in the House and one of its most powerful and effective members through her dynamism and keen intelligence. All of us here also know of her goodness.

We thank Mrs. Lowey for exerting her influence and stature to unanimously enact Public Law 110–102: the renaming of the Wykagyl Post Office for Robert Merrill.

And so we gather today on this dazzling spring morning with Marion, Congresswoman Lowey, and our brilliant young mayor, Noam Bramson.

We thank the officials of the U.S. Postal Service: our own Postmaster General, Jerry Shapiro; and the District Chief, Mr. Joseph Lubrano, who oversees hundreds of post offices.

We are also joined by Yankees greats Roy White and Mike Torrez; Mr. George Steinbrenner’s personal representative, Deborah Tyman; and her associate, Greg King. Bob Merrill reveled in his long association with our beloved Yankees. He often wore his World Series rings

-324-

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