Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

JOE MACARILLO AND THE
SUN VALLEY TRIO

Sun Valley, Idaho, was America’s first great ski resort.
Founded by Averell Harriman and his Union Pacific pals,
Sun Valley still draws a moneyed crowd. There are several
glorious saloons in the town, including my favorite, the
Pioneer and Michel Rudigoz’s Cristiania, where you can
rub elbows with Supreme Court justices and throw down a
drink with the crooner Jack Jones of an evening. But by
far, the most welcoming venue in this upscale town is the
Lodge Dining Room in the Sun Valley Lodge, presided over
by Claude Guignon. It’s the most spectacular dining room
in North America, with lovely “society” music every night
provided by an old smoothie named Joe Macarillo. After
he played sweet music for the swells for about fifty years,
they decided to honor him. These are my remarks upon
that occasion on September 20, 2003.

Ladies and gentlemen, I won’t intrude for very long on your evening or on Joe’s beautiful music.

Nancy and I just flew in from New York, and on our first night in town we usually head straight for the Pio, Duffy Witmer’s Pioneer Saloon, saving this legendary Lodge Dining Room until later in the week. But this is a very special occasion.

We’re here tonight, Joe, because we love you. And we love your sweet music.

Thank you for all the memorable nights you’ve bestowed upon us, and for all the lovely songs.

For fifty years you and the Sun Valley Trio have accompanied our courting rites on this very dance floor, with a lot more grace than our earnest but clumsy moves to the strains of your wonderful melodies.

You’ve also witnessed thousands of young couples taking their first tenuous steps and moving across this fabled dance floor in each other’s arms to the graceful melodies of your songs.

-336-

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