Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

SIRIO: THE BRIGHTEST STAR

And we broadcast this “review” of Le Cirque on February
7, 2008.

New York is crammed with eateries employing a bevy of bimbos flanked by a dour, self-important maître d’ standing imperiously behind a lectern punching numbers into a computer. Think BLT Steak on 57th owned by moneyman Jimmy Haber, or Quality Meats on 58th Street, and its cousin, The Post House, where the venerable Quo Vadis once shined.

But this town still offers cozy restaurants with beckoning proprietors unaffected by “investors.” The permittees of these agreeable havens have names such as Arpaia, Burke, Niccolini, Carravagi, Von Bidder, Zuliani, Selimaj, Cipriani, Lomonaco, Masson, Tong, Dussin, McGuire, Viterale, Suric, Bruno, and, up in the Bronx, Migliucci. One of these old-school purveyors of food and hospitality, Sirio Maccioni, is the best of all of them.

The great Sirio was ensconced this recent winter night at a small round table near the coat room of his dazzling enterprise, Le Cirque, off 58th Street on the East Side of Manhattan. The unobtrusive table is known to every busboy, waiter, captain, bartender, and sommelier as “Maestro Sirio’s table.”

The out-of-the-way location, however, does offer a strategic vantage point of any shapely legs or low-cut dresses coming through the revolving front door. At age seventy-five, the Ringmaster of Le Cirque misses nothing.

For most of this dreary February day, the handsome Tuscan waits like an angry lion for the latest review by the Times’s gifted food critic, Frank Bruni, who, two years ago, denied Maccioni three stars.

The brilliant Bruni, who served as Houston bureau chief for the Times when George W. Bush was governor, and as Rome bureau chief in the Eternal City, is now the most powerful food critic in America.

On this winter night, no one approached the man in the elegant velvet dinner jacket at the round table near the coat room. Even his

-344-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 700

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.