Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

JUDGE YE NOT

It’s so difficult to persuade men and women of real quality
to submit to the rigors of public life. And thus
government, at almost every level, is populated by hacks.
However, as you will note throughout this volume, there
are exceptions. One such exception is Judge Preston
“Sandy” Scher, who serves, with distinction, in the
relatively thankless job of New Rochelle City Judge.
Because he is not a “politician,” Judge Scher has often
had to scramble to get reelected. In the end, however, real
quality prevailed. I spoke on the radio about the fine work
of Judge Scher in March 2005.

On the façade of the Federal Courthouse at Foley Square in lower Manhattan are chiseled these words: “The True Administration of Justice Is the Firmest Pillar of Good Government.”

It’s a long way away from New Rochelle. But the majestic words of that noble pronouncement apply to our home heath as well.

In our city, we are blessed with eminent institutions, including a great regional medical center; three colleges, College of New Rochelle, Iona College, and Monroe College; and three extraordinary prep schools, Ursuline, Iona, and Thornton-Donovan. Our great school system and enlightened city government are unsurpassed in New York state.

Phil Reisman, the brilliant writer for Gannett, describes these assets as “the third sector.” And we got it pretty good.

New Rochelle has also won the favor of Louis Cappelli, the great visionary mega-developer and philanthropist who is transforming our skyline. We’re also home to another individual of great generosity and achievement, Sidney Frank, the wine and spirits baron.

And yet these illustrious residents and third-sector institutions are only some of the reasons for our civic pride. There is yet another essential entity, and it ensures public safety and domestic tranquility. And without it, we have no community.

-351-

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