Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

TALESE THE WRITER

I’ve always admired all those wordsmiths who write so
much more gracefully than I am able. That long list
includes Jimmy Breslin, Pete Hamill, Jimmy Cannon, Bill
Saroyan, Ken Auletta, David Hinckley, Nancy Q. Keefe,
Mario Cuomo, Phil Reisman, Wilfred Sheed, Whitney
Balliett, and Gay Talese. Here is a review of Gay Talese’s
memoir A Writer’s Life, broadcast April 14, 2006.

Maybe you think you’ve got a budding author in the family? A condition that never threatened my old man.

Well, O.K., it only costs around $50,000 a year—just for the tuition—at the Columbia School of Journalism. If your kid is so inclined, you could always contact the “J” School and pay off the tab for the next five years.

Or you could just shell out twenty-six bucks and buy the kid a copy of A Writer’s Life by Gay Talese, the great New York journalist, reporter, and author.

Mr. Talese, whose earlier magazine pieces on Frank Sinatra, Joe DiMaggio, and Floyd Patterson are the stuff of legend, has finally written about himself.

The son and heir of a master tailor from Calabria, Gay Talese once created exquisite haberdashery, but he now uses graceful words and elegant sentences to create exquisite books.

He’s written several bestsellers, such as The Kingdom and the Power about the New York Times, Honor Thy Father about the Mafia, and Unto the Sons about immigrants in America. Also, a dazzling collection of magazine and newspaper gems, The Gay Talese Reader.

The highbrow Atlantic Monthly opined, “Gay Talese has written some of the best American prose of the second half of the twentieth century.” And David Halberstam, in the Boston Globe, pegged Talese as “the most important nonfiction writer of his generation.”

Forget all that stuff. After you save yourself $49,974.00 in college tuition for your gifted kid, buy another copy of A Writer’s Life for yourself and stay up for two nights as I did reading it.

-361-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 700

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.