Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

ELIOT SPITZER, ONCE
AND FORMER GOVERNOR

We spoke about the fallen governor’s troubles on March
12, 2008.

It is an excruciating personal tragedy for the Governor, his family and the rest of our society to whom he has meant so much.

Governor Mario Cuomo

Once again Mario Cuomo got it exactly right. The great philosopher-statesman who once occupied the high office Eliot Spitzer [is relinquishing] framed this bizarre episode with precision and his usual compassion.

All the editorial writers and every journal in the land have relentlessly denounced Eliot Spitzer in recent days. But as he who held so much promise steps down in disgrace, my mind drifts back to a conversation we had some years ago in this very same radio studio with then–Attorney General Spitzer. It was during the very worst time for Al and Jeanine Pirro. (You remember them, shy, modest, and retiring as they were!)

As Spitzer sat in our Westchester radio studio on that day long ago taking calls from our listeners, Albert J. Pirro was fighting for his own freedom and reputation in a U.S. District Federal Court up the road a piece in White Plains.

As the program went on, it may be recalled, I gave him several opportunities to jump on the Pirros. However, and despite his “steamroller” rep, he refused to hit Al or Jeanine Pirro when they were down. I remember that.

Now, on this sad day, who, I wonder, will cut Eliot Spitzer a break?

For all his character deficits, obvious failings, and all-too-human weaknesses—those we know about and those we have not yet identified—some goodness must still reside in the man.

For one thing, he was able to win the favor and devotion of a remarkable woman—Silda Spitzer. And together, they have three

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