Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

JEANINE PIRRO AT THE
DUTCH TREAT CLUB

Judge Jeanine Pirro was a vivid and colorful presence in
Westchester before she became a television star. In the
many different seasons of her life, the comely politician
has never resembled a shrinking violet. She appeared
before the Dutch Treat Club in Manhattan on January 20,
2004, to talk about her life and career. The well-founded
members of the prestigious luncheon club were dazzled by
Pirro’s presentation.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY: Ladies and gentlemen, I have to tread carefully here. Because I was asked to introduce the district attorney since our estimable Ralph Graves, the president of the Dutch Treat Club, is in Florida. So I initially agreed, but after hanging up, I thought, “Don’t go there, O’Shaughnessy. You should call in sick that day.”

Because, you see, I had previously introduced Gloria Steinem to a thousand broadcasters in Cooperstown, near the Baseball Hall of Fame. And I blithely said, “She is as beautiful and attractive as she is bright and able.” And Ms. Steinem fixed me with a most malevolent stare. And all the upstate papers, including the AP, called it a “withering glance.” (laughter)

So I don’t call people beautiful or attractive any more. Only bright and able. (laughter) I’m not going to call you ugly, Jeanine, so you don’t have to worry! (laughter) Our star feature columnist, Phil Reisman, calls her “comely” in his graceful Gannett columns. But I’ve learned my lesson.

In Westchester County, the Golden Apple—or the “Outback” as our late president Lowell Thomas called it—there is no presence more dazzling than Jeanine Pirro’s. You see her on “Geraldo,” and I saw her on “Larry King” last week. Incidentally, I don’t want to stir up trouble with your husband, but from the way Larry King was looking at you, I think he was measuring you up for wife

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