Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

MARIO CUOMO AT THE DUTCH TREAT
CLUB, 104TH ANNIVERSARY

The governor spoke again to this prestigious group four
years later, on October 7, 2008.

WILLIAM O’SHAUGHNESSY: Our altogether distinguished speaker is known and admired for many things. That the Boston Globe accused him of being “the great philosopher-statesman of the American nation” is known to everyone here assembled. I mean, you just know these things! (laughter) He is also, I should tell you, a famous father and an illustrious husband. He’s the father of the star of ABC’s “Good Morning, America,” Chris Cuomo. He’s the father of Maria Cuomo, the dazzling head of Housing Enterprise for the Less Privileged (H.E.L.P.), the largest provider of homeless housing in the world. He’s the husband of the incomparable Matilda Cuomo, the founder of Mentoring, USA.

He has an adoring son-in-law, a rich designer and philanthropist named Kenneth Cole. And he has yet another son and heir, named Andrew, whom John McCain wants to use to straighten out Washington, even though he’s a Democrat! Andrew is also quite gainfully employed at the people’s business as the attorney general of New York in whom we are all so well pleased. (applause)

Along the way, our keynote speaker has done some things on his very own as well, and I have a list of his accomplishments. I have it right here … someplace. (laughter) Actually, he’s had time to write nine beautifully graceful books which should commend him to the favorable judgment of all the authors and writers in the room like James Brady, Sidney Offit, and Ralph Graves. (applause) But I must tell you, this is the time—every four years—when I get good and mad at him for denying us the opportunity to put him in the damn White House or on the Supreme Court. (applause) For that you applaud? (laughter)

But he was governor of New York for twelve years, as you know. And every time he sits down to think or write, every time

-425-

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