Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

MAMA ROSE MIGLIUCCI:
“THE FIRST LADY OF LITTLE ITALY”

When I gave the eulogy for Mario Migliucci, the graceful
patriarch of Mario’s, the iconic landmark restaurant on
Arthur Avenue in the Little Italy–Belmont section of the
Bronx, in 1998, there were more than 1,000 people in the
Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel—fishmongers,
bakers, butchers, greengrocers, and the people of the
neighborhood in their black. There weren’t that many
mourners for his dear wife when she passed away last
year at ninety-three. But there was just as much love in
the Bronx church when “Mama Rose” went off to be
reunited with her beloved husband. Nancy Curry
O’Shaughnessy once observed, “This was the kind of
mother we should all have …”.

May it please you, Reverend Father Eric Rapaglia …

Your posting as pastor here at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel is a great gift from His Eminence, for the parish and for the neighborhood.

And Mama Rose would have been so pleased by the presence on the altar of Monsignor Bill O’Brien, the legendary founder and chairman of Daytop Village, who enjoys a well-deserved international reputation; and also Father Sebastian Bacatan, the parochial vicar of St. Pius X, where he serves the “underprivileged,” the “poor” and “distressed” of Scarsdale, N.Y., with another great priest, Father John O’Brien.

Actually, we’ve been here before in this great Bronx church on another bittersweet occasion accompanied then as now with a rich admixture of sadness and joy.

It was one month shy of ten years ago that we prayed for and remembered “Pop”: Mario Migliucci. On that day, January 27, 1998, the people of the neighborhood came together as you have now to bid farewell to another legend of the Bronx. They came out of their

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