Vox Populi: The O'Shaughnessy Files

By William O’Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE HISTORIC WVOX/WORLDWIDE
50TH-ANNIVERSARY BROADCAST

In The Screwtape Letters, the great C. S. Lewis wrote that what the devil wants is for a man to finish his life having to say I spent my life not doing either what is right or what I enjoy. For the many years I’ve known him, Bill O’Shaughnessy has spent most of his time doing things he ought to have been doing and enjoying them immensely. Blessed with a great, Gaelic gift of words, a sharp mind, deep convictions, a capacity for powerful advocacy, Bill has been able to inspire the faint-hearted, guide the eager, and charm almost everyone he’s met. He’s a gifted writer of simple truths and powerful political arguments, especially in support of his favorite cause: Free Speech and a Free Press!

He’s also an elegant, entertaining, and spellbinding speaker. He might have taken all these gifts and made himself a great political leader or a very rich captain of industry. Instead, fifty years ago he devoted himself to what then was a small and struggling radio station, and ever since then, thanks to his brilliance and dedication, he’s created what has become his highly valued and much-praised WVOX/Worldwide and WVIP. He enjoys nothing more than to hear important community leaders describe these stations as perfect examples of concerned corporate citizens, as you will hear on this broadcast. Congratulations WVOX and WVIP. Keep going!

Governor Mario M. Cuomo

I have a great honor to join the many saluting Bill O’Shaughnessy for being an outstanding beacon of light, of sanity, journalistic radio excellence! I remember when I first came to New York, I began on WMCA on the 20th of September in 1970, and it wasn’t too long after that I heard about O’Shaughnessy and what he was doing on his stations, WVOX and WVIP. And today Whitney Media is a force to be reckoned with. Bill and I haven’t always agreed on everything. But one thing I can tell you: O’Shaughnessy is every inch a gentleman. I join in saluting Bill and his Whitney Media. Straight ahead!

Bob Grant, pioneering talk show host

-618-

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