Government and Politics in Southeast Asia

By John Funston | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Attempting to explain government and politics for ten Southeast Asian countries in a single volume is an ambitious undertaking. Much has been written on the region in recent years, but most accounts focus on a single country or a single issue (such as democracy, or elections). There is, however, an obvious need for a concise, up-to-date, overview volume that addresses core political science issues — institutions of government, and the nature of political practice — in all Southeast Asian countries. In the writer’s experience, academics, policy-makers, journalists and others have frequently spoken of such a need.

Several attempts have sought to meet such an objective in the past. Early works appeared soon after the term Southeast Asia was adopted — to define a war theatre during World War II — but the first detailed account was Government and Politics of Southeast Asia, edited by George Kahin. This was published by Cornell University Press in 1959, then reappeared in an extensively revised form in 1964.1 Each of the then eight countries (minus Brunei, and with Singapore as part of Malaysia) was examined in terms of four headings: historical background; socio-economic setting; the political process; and major problems. This was a seminal work, and nothing that followed has matched its quality.

Another influential book, Lucian Pye’s Southeast Asian Political Systems, was published in 1969, and followed by a second edition in 1974.2 This looked at the region on a comparative basis, rather than country by country. Although a compact work of less than 100 pages, it was a wellwritten synthesis of major political issues. Early chapters examined geography, history, economy, social organizations and value systems. They were followed by others on ideology, political dynamics (the role of parties, leaders, the military, civilian bureaucracies, interest groups and communist resistance movements), organs of government (a broad look at the constitutional division of power) and performance (the government’s ability to hold the state together and provide basic services).

Two further comparative works on Southeast Asia appeared during the 1970s, by Michael Leifer and Richard Butwell. These were less comprehensive than Pye in discussion of political institutions, and focused more on the themes of post-colonial difficulties, and the retreat from democracy to authoritarianism.3

Another trend in the 1970s was a shift to separate country studies with a common regional focus. Cornell university initiated a series entitled

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Government and Politics in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Contributors ix
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Brunei Malay, Monarchical, Micro-State 1
  • 2 - Cambodia after the Killing Fields 36
  • 3 - Indonesia Transforming the Leviathan 74
  • 4 - Laos Timid Transition 120
  • 5 - Malaysia Developmental State Challenged 160
  • 6 - Myanmar Military in Charge 203
  • 7 - Philippines Continuing People Power 252
  • 8 - Singapore Meritocratic City-State 291
  • 9 - Thailand Reform Politics 328
  • 10 - Vietnam Doi Moi Difficulties 372
  • Conclusion 411
  • Index 425
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 435

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.