The Librarian Spies: Philip and Mary Jane Keeney and Cold War Espionage

By Rosalee McReynolds; Louise S. Robbins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Mary Jane

Philip Olin Keeney and Mary Jane Daniels were born and raised a thousand miles apart, but against backgrounds so similar that they might have been brought up under the same roof. Like Philip, Mary Jane grew up in an atmosphere of small town Protestantism. Like Henry and Susanna Keeney, Frank and Margaret Daniels prided themselves on hard work, valued education for their children, and cherished their AngloSaxon bloodlines. Although Mary Jane was impressed by her husband’s lineage, she was no less pleased with her own. An ancestor on her father’s side had arrived aboard the Mayflower, and she was proud to say that her forebears included the names of men who had fought on both sides in the War for Independence.1 This paternal side of the family apparently prospered, became staunch patriots, and settled into a solid middle-class lifestyle in Illinois.

Her mother’s side of the family had not fared so well. Margaret Bailey’s father had brought his wife and children to America from England in the 1870s after selling his freehold in Devon. Within two years, they returned to England, having lost their money in failed investments in the United States. Ten years later, Mary Jane’s maternal grandparents immigrated back to America with their children and proceeded to squander a recently inherited fortune. Mary Jane did not disclose much more about their fate, except to say that by marrying Frank Daniels in 1888 her mother gained American citizenship.

Compared to the Keeneys, the Daniels family was financially and socially comfortable. Pillars of the community, they had no cause to strike

-15-

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The Librarian Spies: Philip and Mary Jane Keeney and Cold War Espionage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Philip 9
  • Chapter 2 - Mary Jane 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Librarians 25
  • Chapter 4 - Struggle 47
  • Chapter 5 - The Progressive Librarians’ Council 53
  • Chapter 6 - The Spies at Home 65
  • Chapter 7 - The Spies Abroad 87
  • Chapter 8 - Caught in the Web 99
  • Chapter 9 - The Un-Americans 112
  • Chapter 10 - Guilt and Association 125
  • Notes 135
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 169
  • About the Authors 185
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