What Great Trainers Do: The Ultimate Guide to Delivering Engaging and Effective Learning

By Robert Bolton; Dorothy Grover Bolton | Go to book overview

19
Evaluating the Workshop

Conducting training without evaluation is like flying without instruments.

——Ronald Meyer

While some companies have moved toward on-line forms of evaluation, a common scenario regarding the evaluation of workshops is that the trainer is provided evaluation forms to use at the conclusion of the workshop. Typically, he walks into the classroom and the forms are sitting on a table. He picks one up and glances at it to be sure they are the right evaluations for this particular training. He may study it for a few minutes to see what the participants will be rating. But that’s about it. Generally, decisions concerning the level of workshop evaluation and the content and form of the evaluation are made prior to the training and without the involvement of the trainer. So why would we include information about evaluation of training in this book? Trainers need to be knowledgeable about the purpose and value of each of the levels of evaluation of training and be informed contributors if and when they are involved in discussions about evaluation. And being fairly knowledgeable about evaluation enables them to be more effective in their part in administering it.

This chapter presents an overview of the five levels of evaluation of training, an estimate of how frequently each level is used, and a brief discussion of some factors to consider when determining the appropriate level to use for a given training program. Due to limitations of space and the infrequency of use of evaluation levels 2 to 5, this chapter focuses primarily on the universally used level 1: evaluation of satisfaction. We also note the important but seldom employed contribution that participants’ spoken assessments can add to the evaluation process. If you want to learn about evaluation levels 2 to 5—or delve deeper into level 1—consider supplement-

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