What Great Trainers Do: The Ultimate Guide to Delivering Engaging and Effective Learning

By Robert Bolton; Dorothy Grover Bolton | Go to book overview

23
Intervening to Eliminate an Individual’s
Disruptive Behavior

It is important to remember that this is a discussion: two people are participating in a conversation.
You are not lecturing someone
.

——Ferdinand Fournies1

You’ve been teaching the class for half a day and your sense is that, by and large, things seem to be going well. The group has good energy, discussions have been lively, and questions and comments have been insightful. So far, so good.Well, not quite. Although the group is going well, there is one participant, Jamie Baker, who makes no eye contact with you. He has not spoken in the group or mixed with other participants on breaks. He’s also the last person to return from breaks. During your presentations his head is down as he reads some unrelated material. At other times during presentations he engages the people on either side of him in conversation. As you continue leading the group, you’re aware that this is a problem that you’ll have to do something about. But what?This chapter answers that question by describing the following:
Common sources of disengaged or disruptive behavior
How to prevent much disengaged or disruptive behavior
A series of increasingly potent interventions to manage problems

Common Sources of Disengaged or Disruptive Behavior

In everyday life people react to what’s going on around them and these reactions often influence how they behave. That doesn’t change when they enter a workshop.

-192-

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