Community Policing: International Patterns and Comparative Perspectives

By Dominique Wisler; Ihekwoaba D. Onwudiwe | Go to book overview

1
Rethinking Police
and Society
Community Policing
in Comparison

DOMINIQUE WISLER IHEKWOABA D. ONWUDIWE

Contents
Introduction1
Case Studies4
The Ambiguity of Community Policing: The Issue of the “Model”5
The Lack of a Community-Policing Paradigm as a Handicap7
Intermediaries and the State8
Institutionalization of Informal Policing: Defining the Frontier10
The Risks of Informal Policing12
Importation of Models14
References16

Introduction

The book reunites contributions of authors who are rarely encountered in the same workshops and conferences. The first are criminologists, lawyers, sometimes ex-cops (studying criminal justice processes), and police. The second are anthropologists, ethnologists, and social movements researchers focusing on informal ordering processes situated at community or civil society level. Both groups usually ignore each other despite the fact that they are quite often interested in the same issue: strategies of approaching security and crime.

The former group studies top-down policing. Core topics of their inquiries are legal and constitutional frameworks of policing and doctrines as well as police bureaucracies and their praxis in responding to crime and disorders. The latter group describes bottom-up communities’ strategies mobilizing their own resources to deal with insecurity when the state appears distant, unresponsive, and sometimes partisan, inhospitable, and oppressive. Core

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