Community Policing: International Patterns and Comparative Perspectives

By Dominique Wisler; Ihekwoaba D. Onwudiwe | Go to book overview

5
The French Centralized
Model of Policing
Control of the Citizens

CHRISTIAN MOUHANNA

Contents
Introduction103
A System Not Focused on Public Service105
 Consequences of Centralization105
 The Public Order: Protect the State107
 Governing the Police through Figures108
Police Practices: Between Bureaucracy and Hidden Way of Acting111
 The Police Officer and the Rules112
 Two Models of Policing in France113
Reform and Police Officers’ Practices: Reinforcing the Command and Control System115
 A First Attempt without Benefit of Instruction115
 The Second Attempt: Law and Order Proximity117
 Counterrevolution of Policing119
References122

Introduction

From a theoretical point of view, the French system of policing seems to be one of the more rational and one of the more efficient of Western democracies. The national police forces, which represent the main part of the police forces, are organized in a very hierarchical and centralized way. All rules governing these forces are produced in a top-down logic, supervised by the Ministère de l’Intérieur (Home Office) in Paris. This centralization is supposed to offer the best way to use the police officers and the materials.

Actually, this kind of management is related to a more global paradigm, which explains the functioning of the French state and the French society. First, it has to be said that the police force is not the only organization following this model. Schools and energy supplies—and also essential parts of the French economy—were until the end of the 1990s organized in a national

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Community Policing: International Patterns and Comparative Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 327

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.