The Beginning of All Things: Science and Religion

By Hans Küng; John Bowden | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
The End of All Things

Like the prophet Joel (2:10), the New Testament too speaks of the sun being darkened and the moon losing its light, the stars falling from heaven and the powers of heaven being shaken in the last tribulation (Matt. 24:29). Aren’t these spooky enough visions in the light of theories of the end time in physics? But it is necessary to warn against theological fallacies about the end of the world as much as against fallacies about the beginning of the world. Here too theology has to make up for the understandable prejudices it has produced among scientists.


Hypotheses of the End in Physics

Of course, astrophysicists also speculate about the end: in around 5 billion years the Andromeda Galaxy will collide with our Milky Way and billions of stars will be hurled around the universe. At the same time, the sun will swell up into a “red giant.” Then all life still existing on our earth will die out. Is all that so certain? Much that is taught in physics about the “last three minutes” of the universe is speculative. Moreover, the American physicist Paul Davies gave his book, which is a good summary of futurological research, the appropriate subtitle “Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe.”1

1. Cf. P. Davies, The Last Three Minutes: Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe (New York, 1994).

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The Beginning of All Things: Science and Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Let There Be Light! xi
  • Chapter I - A Unified Theory of Everything? 1
  • Chapter II - God as Beginning? 43
  • Chapter III - Creation of the World or Evolution? 85
  • Chapter IV - Life in the Cosmos? 129
  • Chapter V - The Beginning of Humankind 161
  • Epilogue - The End of All Things 199
  • A Word of Thanks 207
  • Index 209
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