The Beginning of All Things: Science and Religion

By Hans Küng; John Bowden | Go to book overview

A Word of Thanks

As early as the 1970s I turned to the question Does God Exist? An Answer for Today (1978), following my book On Being a Christian (1974), and in doing so studied the most recent state of research into cosmology in astrophysics and microbiology. In 1994, in a semester colloquium with my Tübingen colleagues at the Institute of Physics, Professors Amand Fässler, Friedrich Gönnenwein, Herbert Müther, Herbert Pfister, Friedemann Rex, Günther Staudt, and Karl Wildermuth, entitled “Our Cosmos: Scientific and Philosophical-Theological Aspects,” I was able to test my views and finally to sum them up in twenty-two theses.

After I had completed my trilogy, the Religious Situation of Our Time series — Judaism (1991), Christianity (1994), and Islam (2004) — an invitation from the German Society of Natural Scientists and Physicists to give the ceremonial lecture at their annual gathering in Passau on 19 September 2004 was a challenging occasion to concern myself afresh with the basic questions of cosmology, and after that of biology and anthropology.

I was reassured that I could show the difficult passages of my manuscript to knowledgeable professional colleagues from the natural sciences. I am extremely grateful to Professors Amand Fässler (theoretical physics), who has already been mentioned in the text, Ulrich Felgner (logic, foundations and history of mathematics), Alfred Gierer (developmental biology), and Regina Ammicht-Quinn (theological ethics).

I received an encouraging response from a wide public when in the

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The Beginning of All Things: Science and Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Let There Be Light! xi
  • Chapter I - A Unified Theory of Everything? 1
  • Chapter II - God as Beginning? 43
  • Chapter III - Creation of the World or Evolution? 85
  • Chapter IV - Life in the Cosmos? 129
  • Chapter V - The Beginning of Humankind 161
  • Epilogue - The End of All Things 199
  • A Word of Thanks 207
  • Index 209
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