Race and the Literary Encounter: Black Literature from James Weldon Johnson to Percival Everett

By Lesley Larkin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

FIRST, THANK YOU TO THE EDITORS AND STAFF AT INDIANA University Press, including Robert Sloan, Jenna Whitaker, Darja Malcolm-Clarke, and Eric Levy, for believing in and supporting this project. You have been a pleasure to work with. Support for this book has also been provided by several institutions. I would like to thank the University of Washington for a Preparing Future Faculty grant and travel funding, Seattle Pacific University for a research and teaching fellowship, and Northern Michigan University for three Reassigned Time Awards, a Faculty Research Grant, and generous travel support. This book would not exist without the largesse of these institutions. I am also grateful to have taught, at each of these schools, smart and engaging students whose effort to engage in dialogue with African American literature is my primary inspiration.

I must also acknowledge the help and encouragement imparted by numerous mentors, colleagues, and friends. The English faculty at Linfield College – particularly Lex Runciman and Barbara Seidman – taught me that literature does real and lasting work in the world. I also owe tremendous thanks to the English and Comparative Literature faculty at the University of Washington, with special credit due to Carolyn Allen, Katherine Cummings, Gillian Harkins, Chandan Reddy, Cynthia Steele, and Alys Eve Weinbaum for shepherding me through the courses, projects, and dissertation that laid the groundwork for this book. To Alys, especially: your intelligence, empathy, rigor, and commitment continue to guide me. To the talented minds I studied alongside at the University of Washington, including Jeff Chiu, Lana Dalley, Jill Gatlin,

-ix-

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Race and the Literary Encounter: Black Literature from James Weldon Johnson to Percival Everett
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Blacks in the Diaspora ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Scenes of Reading, Scenes of Racialization- Modern and Contemporary Black Literature 3
  • One - Unbinding the Double Audience 33
  • Two - Speakerly Reading 65
  • Three - Close Reading "You" 93
  • Four - Erasing Precious 125
  • Five - Reading and Being Read 165
  • Epilogue - Toward a Theory and Pedagogy of Responsible Reading 191
  • Notes 215
  • Bibliography 245
  • Index 261
  • Blacks in the Diaspora 279
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