Race and the Literary Encounter: Black Literature from James Weldon Johnson to Percival Everett

By Lesley Larkin | Go to book overview

Blacks in the Diaspora

Herman L. Bennett, Kim D. Butler, Judith A. Byfield, and Tracy Sharpley-Whiting, editors

Founding Editors: Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey, Jr., and David Barry Gaspar

A Question of Manhood: A Reader in U.S. Black Men’s History and Masculinity. Volume 1: “Manhood Rights”: The Construction of Black Male History and Manhood, 1750–1870. Edited by Darlene Clark Hine and Earnestine L. Jenkins

A Question of Manhood: A Reader in U.S. Black Men’s History and Masculinity. Volume 2. The 19th Century: From Emancipation to Jim Crow. Edited by Darlene Clark Hine and Earnestine L. Jenkins

A Refuge in Thunder: Candomblé and Alternative Spaces of Blackness. Rachel E. Harding

A Turbulent Time: The French Revolution and the Greater Caribbean. Edited by David Barry Gaspar and David Patrick Geggus

African American Women in the Struggle for the Vote, 1850–1920. Rosalyn Terborg-Penn

African Cinema: Politics and Culture. Manthia Diawara

Africanisms in American Culture. Edited by Joseph E. Holloway

Africanisms in American Culture, Second Edition. Edited by Joseph E. Holloway

Africans in Colonial Mexico: Absolutism, Christianity, and Afro-Creole Consciousness, 1570–1640. Herman L. Bennett

“All the World Is Here!” The Black Presence at White City. Christopher Robert Reed

Archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora. Edited by Akinwumi Ogundiran and Toyin Falola

Artists, Performers, and Black Masculinity in the Haitian Diaspora. Jana Evans Braziel

The Atlantic World: 1450–2000. Edited by Toyin Falola and Kevin D. Roberts

Barriers between Us: Interracial Sex in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cassandra Jackson

Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery. Howard McGary and Bill E. Lawson

Binding Cultures: Black Women Writers in Africa and the Diaspora. Gay Wilentz

Black Female Playwrights: An Anthology of Plays before 1950. Edited with an Introduction by Kathy A. Perkins

Black Police in America. W. Marvin Dulaney

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and the Literary Encounter: Black Literature from James Weldon Johnson to Percival Everett
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Blacks in the Diaspora ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Scenes of Reading, Scenes of Racialization- Modern and Contemporary Black Literature 3
  • One - Unbinding the Double Audience 33
  • Two - Speakerly Reading 65
  • Three - Close Reading "You" 93
  • Four - Erasing Precious 125
  • Five - Reading and Being Read 165
  • Epilogue - Toward a Theory and Pedagogy of Responsible Reading 191
  • Notes 215
  • Bibliography 245
  • Index 261
  • Blacks in the Diaspora 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.