Creating Web-Based Training: A Step-by-Step Guide to Designing Effective E-Learning

By Joseph T. Sinclair; Lani Wallin Sinclair et al. | Go to book overview

4
Adding Links

Hyperlinks (links) provide the primary method of navigating between and even within Web pages. When you click on a link to another Web page, the file is sent by the Web server and downloaded into your browser. A link can also go to another spot within the same Web page. When you click on one of these links, the browser repositions the Web page, moving to the targeted location. These target locations are called anchors.

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Creating Web-Based Training: A Step-by-Step Guide to Designing Effective E-Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Introduction xxxiii
  • I - Creating Web Pages 1
  • 1 - Web Pages 3
  • 2 - Creating a Web Page 13
  • 3 - Adding Images 41
  • 4 - Adding Links 57
  • II - Refining Web Pages 77
  • 5 - Webtop Publishing 79
  • 6 - Color and Images 105
  • 7 - Navigation and Menus 131
  • III - Publishing Web Pages 153
  • 8 - Web Hosting 155
  • IV - Wbt Basics 169
  • 9 - Defining Wbt 171
  • 10 - Interactivity and Usability 185
  • 11 - Supplementary Protocols 209
  • 12 - Types of Wbt 227
  • V - Advanced Web Techniques 263
  • 13 - Embedded Programming 265
  • 14 - Forms 283
  • 15 - Readable Text 295
  • 16 - Complementary Technologies 311
  • VI - Advanced Wbt Techniques 331
  • 17 - Streaming Sound 333
  • 18 - Streaming Video 363
  • 19 - Smil 381
  • 20 - Advanced Software 395
  • 21 - Designing Wbt 411
  • VII - Wbt Projects 441
  • 22 - Using XML 443
  • 23 - Book Wbt Project 455
  • 24 - Wbt Projects 461
  • 25 - Wbt Costs 473
  • Appendix I- Top 12 479
  • Appendix II- HTML Tutorial 481
  • Appendix III- Smil Tutorial 521
  • Appendix IV- Resource List 543
  • Index 571
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