Romans: Interpreted by Early Christian Commentators

By J. Patout Burns Jr.; Constantine Newman | Go to book overview

Appendix 1: Authors of Works Excerpted

Ambrosiaster (probably fourth century) is a name given to an unknown early Christian writer who wrote commentaries in Latin on the thirteen letters of Paul, perhaps in Rome at the time of Pope Damasus (366-84). His commentaries were attributed to Ambrose (hence the name “Ambrosiaster”), but this attribution has been rejected by scholars since the Renaissance. His commentary on Romans has survived in three slightly different versions. Ambrosiaster is also assumed to be the author of a work called Questions on the Old and New Testaments.

Anonymous is used to name the unidentified author of a complete commentary on the letters of Paul (including Hebrews) which was found in a Latin manuscript in the Hungarian National Library. It seems to have been written in the late fourth century and overlaps significantly with the commentary of Pelagius.

Apollinaris (ca. 315–ca. 390) was a close associate of Athanasius of Alexandria and supporter of the Council of Nicea. He was chosen bishop of Laodicea about 360. Apollinaris developed an understanding of the union of divine and human in Christ, according to which the human mind and will were replaced by the divine. He also wrote treatises against Greek philosophers and extensive commentaries on Scripture which have been lost. His commentary on Romans survives only in fragments.

Augustine (354-430), bishop of Hippo, was the preeminent Latin theologian of the patristic period. Trained as a teacher of rhetoric, he spent many years as a Manichean before being baptized by Ambrose in Milan in 387. The immense corpus of his writings includes the autobiographical Confessions, the Trinity, his most important dogmatic work, and The City of God, in which he answers pagan critics of Christianity through a synthesis of philosophical, theological, and political ideas that was to become a foundational text for Western civilization. Augustine wrote commentaries on Genesis (the Literal Commentary on Genesis), the Psalms, the Gospel of John, Galatians, and two partial commentaries on Romans. The explanation of themes treated by Paul in Romans is central to much of his other writing and preaching.

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Romans: Interpreted by Early Christian Commentators
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Church’s Bible i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Interpreting the New Testament xiii
  • An Introduction to Romans xxiii
  • Preface to Romans 1
  • Romans 1 13
  • Romans 2 37
  • Romans 3 61
  • Romans 4 83
  • Romans 5 102
  • Romans 6 132
  • Romans 7 154
  • Romans 8 182
  • Romans 9 217
  • Romans 10 245
  • Romans 11 260
  • Romans 12 289
  • Romans 13 314
  • Romans 14 334
  • Romans 15 359
  • Romans 16 381
  • Appendix 1- Authors of Works Excerpted 394
  • Appendix 2- Sources of Texts Translated 396
  • Index of Names 414
  • Index of Subjects 417
  • Index of Scripture References 422
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