The Ten Commandments for Jews, Christians, and Others

By Roger E. Van Harn | Go to book overview

Response

Calvin P. Van Reken

In his essay Professor Diamond graciously accommodates the numbering of the commandments adopted for this volume; in so doing he includes his reflections on both the Jewish first commandment and the first part of the Jewish second commandment. (The Jewish first commandment is taken by Christians as the prologue to the commandments.) Both the Jewish reading and the Reformed understanding of the prologue take it as providing a contextual foundation for the whole Decalogue. In this brief response I will engage Professor Diamond regarding a few of his lines of inquiry with respect to the prologue and first commandment. My primary intent, however, will be to lay out a Christian and Reformed understanding of the prologue and first commandment.

Professor Diamond’s provocative essay is full of imaginative insights as to the conceptual foundations of the Decalogue. Foremost among these are his reflections on the identity of the God whose voice was heard at Sinai. An undeniable link does exist between the prologue and the first commandment since “YHWH” of the prologue is the antecedent of the pronoun “me” in the first commandment. Thus Professor Diamond’s focus on the “I am” of the prologue is perfectly fitting. In his reflections he draws upon a long history of rabbinic reflection, a history with which he is very familiar. My own familiarity with this tradition is not great, so it was interesting for me to follow some of the hermeneutic strategies that are used within that tradition. For example, Diamond draws conclusions from the fact that Exodus 20 begins with the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, an aleph, while Genesis 1 begins with the second letter, a beth. For Diamond this raises the issue whether the law logically precedes the creation. Framing the issue by this consideration proceeds from a kind of attention

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ten Commandments for Jews, Christians, and Others
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword viii
  • Preface xi
  • The Ten Words - Exodus 20:2-17 (New Revised Standard Version) 1
  • The First Word - The Face of Ethical Encounter 3
  • Response 16
  • The Second Word - No Other Gods 23
  • Response 40
  • The Third Word - The Blessing of God’s Name 47
  • Response 62
  • The Fourth Word - The Sabbath Day 69
  • Response 80
  • The Fifth Word - Honoring Parents 87
  • Response 100
  • The Sixth Word - What Have You Done? 113
  • Response 127
  • Response 132
  • The Seventh Word - Sexuality and Marriage 135
  • Response 148
  • The Eighth Word - Calvin and the "Stewardship of Love" 157
  • Response 175
  • The Ninth Word - Bearing True Witness 179
  • Response 194
  • The Tenth Word - God or Mammon 199
  • Response 212
  • Afterword 218
  • Contributors 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.