Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop

By Jeremy Yudkin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to the people who have read this book in manuscript and offered their comments and suggestions. Most of them are acknowledged in the footnotes; others include my students on both sides of the Atlantic, especially Lisa Scoggin and Michael Nock, and the readers for Indiana University Press, Larry Dwyer and John Joyce, to whom I offer my sincere thanks. Trumpeter Thomas Manuel and drummer Matthew Persing were both generous with their time. A particular debt of gratitude is due to Zbigniew Granat, with whom I have discussed jazz in all its aspects for many years. For the transcriptions I had a great deal of initial aural and technical help from medievalist and rock guitarist Todd Scott and additional help from jazz pianist and master carpenter Robert Kelly, whose fine ear caught many of my errors and whose computer skills (and patience) I called upon in formulating the final versions of the musical examples. I am most grateful to Teo Macero for sharing with me his reminiscences of nearly twenty years of working closely with Miles Davis. And, as always, I thank my family for their support, especially my wife, Kathryn, for whom this slender mention is a token of my deep appreciation.

-ix-

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Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Miles Smiles? 1
  • 2 - Birth 8
  • 3 - Groove 17
  • 4 - Voice 31
  • 5 - Kind of Blue 43
  • 6 - "There Is No Justice" 52
  • 7 - Not Happening 58
  • 8 - The Second Quintet 66
  • 9 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 1 70
  • 10 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 2 104
  • Conclusion- Miles Does Smile 122
  • Notes 125
  • Bibliography 145
  • Select Discography 151
  • Index 155
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