Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop

By Jeremy Yudkin | Go to book overview

6. “There Is No Justice”

The summer of 1959 saw the sextet performing at Birdland on Broadway and the Apollo Theater in Harlem, the Blackhawk club in San Francisco, and several summer festivals, including the new Playboy Jazz Festival in Chicago. (In September 1962 Playboy published its first in a long series of lengthy interviews with public figures. Its very first subject was Miles Davis.) At the end of August, the band was back at Birdland. And on August 26, at the peak of Miles Davis’s career to date, disaster struck in the shape of a racist New York policeman. That night, during a break in the proceedings at the club, Davis walked a young white woman to a cab. A patrolman told him to move along, and Davis refused, pointing to his own name advertised on the marquee. During the confrontation a second policeman came up behind Davis and clubbed him repeatedly on the head with a nightstick. Davis was arrested, taken to the police station, and held overnight in jail. Pictures of Davis with his head bandaged

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Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Miles Smiles? 1
  • 2 - Birth 8
  • 3 - Groove 17
  • 4 - Voice 31
  • 5 - Kind of Blue 43
  • 6 - "There Is No Justice" 52
  • 7 - Not Happening 58
  • 8 - The Second Quintet 66
  • 9 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 1 70
  • 10 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 2 104
  • Conclusion- Miles Does Smile 122
  • Notes 125
  • Bibliography 145
  • Select Discography 151
  • Index 155
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