Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop

By Jeremy Yudkin | Go to book overview

7. Not Happening

The early 1960s for Davis were marked by several years of floundering, with regard to both personnel and musical direction. Some of the music produced by this floundering is wonderful, and some of it seems aimless and lost. I have outlined in previous chapters the challenges faced by Davis after the high point of 1959 and Kind of Blue: the encroachment of rock music on the popular imagination; the shock waves produced by Ornette Coleman and the other exponents of free jazz; Davis’s physical ailments; the attack outside Birdland. But the greatest challenge to confront Davis in the early 1960s was the departure from his group of John Coltrane.

Of the great sextet of the late 1950s, Cannonball Adderley was the first to go, leaving in September 1959. And after talking about it for over a year, offering his job to other players, and openly setting himself apart from his colleagues on their final tour together (to Europe), Coltrane finally left to form his own quartet in May 1960.1 This move had a profound effect on

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Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Miles Smiles? 1
  • 2 - Birth 8
  • 3 - Groove 17
  • 4 - Voice 31
  • 5 - Kind of Blue 43
  • 6 - "There Is No Justice" 52
  • 7 - Not Happening 58
  • 8 - The Second Quintet 66
  • 9 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 1 70
  • 10 - The Album Miles Smiles, Side 2 104
  • Conclusion- Miles Does Smile 122
  • Notes 125
  • Bibliography 145
  • Select Discography 151
  • Index 155
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