The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales

By Nathaniel Hawthorne | Go to book overview

OLD TICONDEROGA:
A PICTURE OF THE PAST.

THE greatest attraction, in this vicinity, is the famous old fortress of Ticonderoga, the remains of which are visible from the piazza of the tavern, on a swell of land that shuts in the prospect of the lake. Those celebrated heights, Mount Defiance and Mount Independence, familiar to all Americans in history, stand too prominent not to be recognized, though neither of them precisely correspond to the images excited by their names. In truth, the whole scene, except the interior of the fortress, disappointed me. Mount Defiance, which one pictures as a steep, lofty, and rugged hill, of most formidable aspect, frowning down with the grim visage of a precipice on old Ticonderoga, is merely a long and wooded ridge; and bore at some former period the gentle name of Sugar Hill. The brow is certainly difficult to climb, and high enough to look into every corner of the fortress. St. Clair’s most probable reason, however, for neglecting to occupy it was the deficiency of troops to man the works already constructed, rather than the supposed inaccessibility of Mount Defiance. It is singular that the French never fortified this height, standing, as it does, in the quarter whence they must have looked for the advance of a British army.

In my first view of the ruins, I was favored with the scientific guidance of a young lieutenant of engineers.

-203-

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The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • Preface - To Horatio Bridge, Esq., U.S.N xix
  • The Snow-Image - A Childish Miracle 1
  • The Great Stone Face 23
  • Main-Street 49
  • Ethan Brand - A Chapter from an Abortive Ro­ Mance 87
  • A Bell’s Biography 110
  • Sylph Etherege 119
  • The Canterbury Pilgrims 129
  • Old News 142
  • The Man of Adamant - An Apologue 176
  • The Devil in Manuscript 186
  • John Inglefield’s Thanks­ Giving 196
  • Old Ticonderoga - A Picture of the Past 203
  • The Wives of the Dead 210
  • Little Daffydowndilly 219
  • Major Molineux 228
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