Lives out of Letters: Essays on American Literary Biography and Documentation in Honor of Robert N. Hudspeth

By Robert D. Habich | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A BOOK DEVOTED TO THE INTERSECTION OF BIOGRAPHY AND DOCUMENTS is of necessity a collaboration—between material and interpretation, but also between archives and authors. Citations to specific manuscript collections appear within the essays themselves. But it is a pleasure to acknowledge, with gratitude, the entire list of individuals and libraries who granted permission to use archival material in their possession: the Cooper family; Robert Cowley; Ian von Franckenstein; the Boston Public Library/Rare Books Department; the Houghton Library of Harvard University; Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries; the Massachusetts Historical Society (Manuscript Collection); the Newberry Library, Chicago; The Permissions Company, High Bridge, New Jersey, on behalf of Barbara Thompson Davis, Literary Trustee for the Estate of Katherine Anne Porter; Morris Library, Southern Illinois University; the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin; and the Clifton Waller Barrett Library in The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia Library.

As editor I am grateful to the Department of English and the Office of Academic Research and Sponsored Programs, Ball State University, for grants in support of my work; to a talented and cooperative roster of contributors who knew a good idea when they heard it and gave the project their best work; to Kay Hudspeth, an early co-conspirator; to Wes and Sandy Mott, for hospitality, sound advice, and a great title; and to my wife, Brenda, who has helped in countless ways to bring this book into existence.

-11-

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