Lives out of Letters: Essays on American Literary Biography and Documentation in Honor of Robert N. Hudspeth

By Robert D. Habich | Go to book overview

“Patch-work Labors”: Susan Fenimore Cooper’s
Correspondence and the Emergence of Her
Independent Literary Career

Rochelle Johnson

Do you know of any institution … which would allow its books to
be carried into the country for several weeks at a time? It is a ques-
tion of some little importance to me, or I should not have ventured
to apply to you; but it frequently happens now that my fingers are
idle, and my patch-work labors at a stand, for the want of some vol-
ume to consult, which if within reach would speedily remove the
obstacle in my way.

—Susan Fenimore Cooper to Mr. Jay, 1850

DESPITE HER DIFFICULTY ACQUIRING SOURCES FOR RESEARCH AS A “country” dweller, Susan Fenimore Cooper (1813–1894) carried on what she refers to here as her “patch-work labors” throughout her adult life. She consulted volumes as she investigated various topics, wrote scores of magazine and newspaper articles, edited several book-length volumes, and served as author for several others. Perhaps because the career of her more famous father has overshadowed hers, or perhaps because interest in the work of nineteenth-century women writers arose relatively recently, Susan Cooper’s productive literary career remains largely obscured.1 Her career as a writer was, however, by all measures successful. Before her death in 1894, she had published Elinor Wyllys. A Tale (1845), a novel; Rural Hours (1850), the book about her natural and human community for which she is best known; an annotated edition of British naturalist John Leonard Knapp’s journal (1853); and a small volume whose proceeds benefited the restoration of Mount Vernon (1859). She also published and provided notes for selections from her father’s unpublished manuscripts and produced fifteen substantial introductions to the “Household Edition” of his novels. In addition, Cooper completed many editing proj

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lives out of Letters: Essays on American Literary Biography and Documentation in Honor of Robert N. Hudspeth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.