Lives out of Letters: Essays on American Literary Biography and Documentation in Honor of Robert N. Hudspeth

By Robert D. Habich | Go to book overview

Contributors

JAMES D. BOYER is Associate Professor Emeritus of English at Penn State University, Berks–Lehigh Valley College. He has published numerous essays on Thomas Wolfe in the Thomas Wolfe Review, Studies in Short Fiction, the South Carolina Review, Kennedy’s Thomas Wolfe: A Harvard Perspective, and elsewhere. He is a consulting editor for the Thomas Wolfe Review.

LARRY CARLSON is Professor of English and department chair at the College of Charleston, where he teaches a wide range of courses in American literature. The recipient of the College of Charleston Distinguished Teaching Award and the South Atlantic Association of Departments of English Outstanding Teaching Award, he has thrice been designated a South Carolina Governor’s Distinguished Professor. Among the books and journals in which his publications appear are American Literature, Studies in the American Renaissance, The American Renaissance in New England, Emersonian Circles, American Literary Magazines: The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, The Encyclopedia of American Literature, and The Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism. He was a speaker at the Fruitlands sesquicentennial conference held at Fruitlands Museums.

PHYLLIS COLE is Professor of English, American Studies, and Women’s Studies at Penn State, Delaware County. She has published articles on the Transcendentalists in Studies in the American Renaissance, Studies in Romanticism, ESQ, and The New England Quarterly. Her biography, Mary Moody Emerson and the Origins of Transcendentalism: A Family History, was named Finalist (second place) for the MLA’s James Russell Lowell Prize in 1999.

KATHRYN ZABELLE DEROUNIAN-STODOLA is Professor of English at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She has published extensively on early American women writers and on Indian captivity narratives. Her most recent book is Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives (1998).

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