Women in Law: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Rebecca Mae Salokar; Mary L. Volcansek | Go to book overview

SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR (1930–)

On the first Monday in October of 1981, the Supreme Court of the United States forever changed. For the first time in the nation’s history and the 191 years of the Court, a black-robed woman assumed her place at the dais that had previously seated only men. Joining the ranks of the 101 justices who had come before her, Sandra Day O’Connor secured yet another “first” as a woman in American history. As Senator Edward M. Kennedy noted during O’Connor’s confirmation hearings, “Americans can be proud of this day as we put one more ‘men only’ sign behind us.”1

Justice O’Connor brought with her to the bench a unique mix of experiences. She was schooled during a time when women were expected to be wives and mothers, not politicians or judges. Like many of her generation, she bore the burden of juggling family and career just as women were beginning to break down the social and professional barriers that had kept them out of the workplace. Despite this era of transition, O’Connor managed to garner a wealth of skills in all three branches of government in her home state of Arizona and had a long record of community service. O’Connor was no avid feminist; while she had supported the Equal Rights Amendment as a politician, she was not a frontline advocate for women’s causes in the 1960s and 1970s. But by her works and her accomplishments, Sandra Day O’Connor proved that women could break the glass ceiling if given the opportunity.


FAMILY BACKGROUND AND EDUCATION

Sandra Day was born on March 26, 1930, in El Paso, Texas, one of three children born to Harry and Ada Mae Day.2 Home was a large, 162,000-acre cattle ranch in Arizona that her grandfather had started near the border of south-

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Women in Law: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editorial Advisory Board vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Florence Ellinwood Allen (1884–1966) 17
  • Mary Arden (1947–) 25
  • Anita Augsburg (1857–1943) 31
  • Suzanne Bastid-Basdevant (1906–) 34
  • Miriam Ben-Porat (1918–) 38
  • Myra Bradwell (1831–1882) 45
  • Beverly Blair Cook (1927–) 51
  • Irene R. Cortes (1920–) 62
  • Takako Doi (1928–) 68
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933–) 78
  • Brenda Marjorie Hale (1945–) 88
  • Rosalyn Higgins (1937–) 94
  • Leonilde Iotti (1920–) 101
  • Barbara Charline Jordan (1936–1996) 112
  • Sylvie Kanigi (1953–) 118
  • Carrie Burnham Kilgore (1838–1909) 123
  • Helen Kinnear (1894–1970) 129
  • Claire L’Heureux-DubÉ (1927–) 136
  • Jutta Limbach (1934–) 144
  • Burnita Shelton Matthews (1894–1988) 150
  • Beverley McIachlin (1943–) 159
  • Soia Mentschikoff (1915–1984) 171
  • Constance Baker Motley (1921–) 180
  • Emily Ferguson Murphy (1868–1933) 190
  • Eleanor Holmes Norton (1938–) 202
  • Sandra Day O’Connor (1930–) 210
  • Sadako Ogata (1927–) 219
  • Cecilia MuÑoz Palma (1913–) 231
  • Tamar Pelleg-Sryck (1926–) 237
  • Janet Reno (1938–) 248
  • Mary Robinson (1944–) 257
  • Flerida Ruth P. Romero (193?–) 266
  • Simone RozÈs-Ludwig (1920–) 271
  • Wiltraut Rupp-Von BrÜnneck (1912–1977) 277
  • Helga Seibert (1939–) 283
  • Elisabeth Selbert (1896–1986) 288
  • Margaret a. Somerville (1942–) 292
  • Helene StÖcker (1869–1943) 299
  • Helen Suzman (1917–) 304
  • Leah Tsemel (1945–) 312
  • Agathe Uwilingiyimana (1953–1994) 323
  • Simone Veil-Jacob (1927–) 329
  • Bertha Wilson (1923–) 338
  • Appendix 349
  • Selected Bibliography 353
  • Index 357
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
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