The Amazing Adventures of Bob Brown: A Real-Life Zelig Who Wrote His Way through the 20th Century

By Craig Saper | Go to book overview


SELECT TITLES FROM EMPIRE STATE EDITIONS

Allen Jones with Mark Naison, The Rat That Got Away: A Bronx Memoir

Patrick Bunyan, All Around the Town: Amazing Manhattan Facts and Curiosities, Second Edition

New York’s Golden Age of Bridges. Paintings by Antonio Masi, Essays by Joan Marans Dim, Foreword by Harold Holzer

Daniel Campo, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and Unplanned

John Waldman, Heartbeats in the Muck: The History, Sea Life, and Environment of New York Harbor, Revised Edition

John Waldman (ed.), Still the Same Hawk: Reflections on Nature and New York

Gerard R. Wolfe, The Synagogues of New York’s Lower East Side: A Retrospective and Contemporary View, Second Edition. Photographs by Jo Renée Fine and Norman Borden, Foreword by Joseph Berger

Howard Eugene Johnson with Wendy Johnson, A Dancer in the Revolution: Stretch Johnson, Harlem Communist at the Cotton Club. Foreword by Mark D. Naison

Joseph B. Raskin, The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City’s Unbuilt Subway System

Phillip Deery, Red Apple: Communism and McCarthyism in Cold War New York

North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City. Photographs by Christopher Payne, A History by Randall Mason, Essay by Robert Sullivan

Kirsten Jensen and Bartholomew F. Bland (eds.), Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900–1940. Introduction by Katherine Manthorne

Richard Kostelanetz, Artists’ SoHo: 49 Episodes of Intimate History

Stephen Miller, Walking New York: Reflections of American Writers from Walt Whitman to Teju Cole

Tom Glynn, Reading Publics: New York City’s Public Libraries, 1754–1911

David Borkowski, A Shot Story: From Juvie to Ph.D.

R. Scott Hanson, City of Gods: Religious Freedom, Immigration, and Pluralism in Flushing, Queens. Foreword by Martin E. Marty

For a complete list, see www.empirestateeditions.com.

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