A Time for the Humanities: Futurity and the Limits of Autonomy

By James J. Bono; Tim Dean et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We would like to acknowledge the support we have received from individuals as well as institutions. The initial impetus for this collection came from the inaugural conference of the University at Buffalo Humanities Institute, “New Futures: Humanities, Theory, Arts,” which was graciously supported by the College of Arts and Sciences. We are especially grateful to our colleague Martha Malamud, founding executive director of the Humanities Institute, for her support and inspiration. Buffalo’s new Humanities Institute has provided us with an important opportunity for interdisciplinary exchanges and collaborations, of which this book is one result. We owe a deep debt of gratitude to our friend and colleague Henry Sussman, whose vision and persistence coupled with the critical support of then Dean Uday Sukhatme are together responsible for the very existence of the Humanities Institute at Buffalo. Dean Bruce McCombe has continued this tradition of support for the humanities, providing both moral and material encouragement that has allowed the Humanities Institute to expand its activities and extend its impact both within and beyond the University at Buffalo. We thank assistant director Michele Bewley, whose tireless efforts on behalf of the Institute made our work possible.

Our editor, Helen Tartar, has assisted us with her editorial wisdom and acumen. More important, her brilliant advocacy of the humanities and critical theory has created an indispensable forum for the exchange of books and ideas. The care and critical attention of our copy editor, Edward Batchelder, has made this a better book. We would also like to thank our colleague and friend Gary Nickard for providing inspiration and initial suggestions for the cover image.

We thank our partners and colleagues—Barbara Bono, Ramón SotoCrespo, and Krzysztof Ziarek—for their companionship, humor, and generosity. Finally, we wish to acknowledge that most of the editorial work for this volume took place at our neighborhood teashop, Tru-Teas,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Time for the Humanities: Futurity and the Limits of Autonomy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.