A Time for the Humanities: Futurity and the Limits of Autonomy

By James J. Bono; Tim Dean et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION: FUTURE, HETERONOMY, INVENTION

James J. Bono, Tim Dean, and Ewa Plonowska Ziarek

1. For an interesting analysis concerning these two issues, see the collection of essays The Research University in a Time of Discontent, eds. Jonathan R. Cole, Elinor G. Barber, and Stephen R. Graubard (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994). For an excellent institutional analysis of the three phases of the humanities ranging from the postwar period to the present, see David A. Hollinger, “Introduction,” in The Humanities and the Dynamics of Inclusion, ed. David A. Hollinger (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), pp. 1–22.

2. For the impact of the inclusion of women and previously excluded social groups on the restructuring of the humanities, see “Social Inclusion,” the third part of Hollinger, The Humanities and the Dynamics of Inclusion, pp. 189–269.

3. This quotation comes from the statement on Paulson’s book jacket. He repeats this sentiment in the opening question of his study: “Do the humanities still have a future?” See William Paulson, Literary Culture in a World Transformed: A Future for the Humanities (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2005), p. 1.

4. This is for instance Paulson’s position.

5. David Marshall, “Introduction,” in The Humanities and its Publics, ed. David Marshall, Moderator ACLS Occasional Paper, No 61 (New York: ACLS, 2006), p. 1. This publication as a whole addresses the pressing question of the humanities’ public accountability.

6. G. W. F. Hegel, Introductory Lectures on Aesthetics, trans. Bernard Bosanquet (London: Penguin, 1993), pp. 12–13; Sigmund Freud, Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), in The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, ed. and trans. James Strachey, vol. 18 (London: Hogarth Press, 1953–1975), pp. 1–64; Ernst Bloch, The Spirit of Utopia, trans. Anthony A. Nassar (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2000); Francis Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man (New York: Free Press, 1992); Lee Edelman, No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2004).

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