The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude

By Peter H. Davids | Go to book overview

Series Preface

Commentaries have specific aims, and this series is no exception. Designed for serious pastors and teachers of the Bible, the Pillar commentaries seek above all to make clear the text of Scripture as we have it. The scholars writing these volumes interact with the most important informed contemporary debate, but avoid getting mired in undue technical detail. Their ideal is a blend of rigorous exegesis and exposition, with an eye alert both to biblical theology and the contemporary relevance of the Bible, without confusing the commentary and the sermon.

The rationale for this approach is that the vision of “objective scholarship” (a vain chimera) may actually be profane. God stands over against us; we do not stand in judgment of him. When God speaks to us through his Word, those who profess to know him must respond in an appropriate way, and that is certainly different from a stance in which the scholar projects an image of autonomous distance. Yet this is no surreptitious appeal for uncontrolled subjectivity. The writers of this series aim for an evenhanded openness to the text that is the best kind of “objectivity” of all.

If the text is God’s Word, it is appropriate that we respond with reverence, a certain fear, a holy joy, a questing obedience. These values should be reflected in the way Christians write. With these values in place, the Pillar commentaries will be warmly welcomed not only by pastors, teachers, and students, but by general readers as well.

*    *    *

The two epistles treated in this volume, 2 Peter and Jude, present peculiar challenges to the twenty-first-century commentator. Their strong

-viii-

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The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Pillar New Testament Commentary i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Preface viii
  • Author’s Preface x
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • General Introduction 1
  • The Letter of Jude 5
  • Introduction to Jude 7
  • Commentary on Jude 33
  • The Letter of 2 Peter 119
  • Introduction to 2 Peter 121
  • Commentary on 2 Peter 159
  • Index of Modern Authors 319
  • Index of Subjects 322
  • Index of Scripture References 327
  • Index of Extrabiblical Literature 341
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