The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude

By Peter H. Davids | Go to book overview

Commentary on Jude

I. LETTER OPENING: SALUTATION (vv. 1-2)

1Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James,

To those who have been called, who are loved by God the Father and kept
by Jesus Christ: 2Mercy, peace and love be yours in abundance
.

A Greek letter normally begins with a salutation in the form x to y. Jude 1-2 forms that salutation in our letter. Compared to some of the Pauline letters it is quite brief (perhaps because, unlike Paul’s, Jude’s position and influence were not in dispute), yet it covers the basic parts of a salutation: identification of the author, identification of the addressees, and a greeting formula.

1 The author identifies himself as Jude. Obviously, Jude or Judas (the Greek form of the Hebrew name Judah) was a common name among Jewish Christians since it was a common name among Jews. For example, Jesus chose only twelve apostles, and two of them were named Judas. Therefore, to which of the many Judases in the early church does Jude 1 refer?

First, we need to look at the other elements in the author’s selfdescription to see if they give us any more information. In the next element he identifies himself as “a servant of Jesus Christ.” This type of formula is common in the NT, especially in the greetings in letters. For example, look at the following:

Rom 1:1Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God —

-33-

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The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Pillar New Testament Commentary i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Preface viii
  • Author’s Preface x
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • General Introduction 1
  • The Letter of Jude 5
  • Introduction to Jude 7
  • Commentary on Jude 33
  • The Letter of 2 Peter 119
  • Introduction to 2 Peter 121
  • Commentary on 2 Peter 159
  • Index of Modern Authors 319
  • Index of Subjects 322
  • Index of Scripture References 327
  • Index of Extrabiblical Literature 341
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