An Introduction to International Institutional Law

By Jan Klabbers | Go to book overview

PREFACE

It was in the autumn of 1992, or perhaps the spring of 1993, when I received a phonecall from a former student of mine at the University of Amsterdam, now working for a solicitor’s firm in London. After the usual expressions of surprise and politeness, he asked me what I knew about the responsibility of international organizations under international law.

The short answer was: nothing. Teaching international law in Amsterdam, one was not supposed to inquire into the law of international organizations beyond the merest basics (personality, the legal status of General Assembly resolutions, collective security, that sort of thing); after all, we had a separate department (or section, rather) to cover international institutional law.

The one thing I did remember from my student days was that the law of international organizations was taught to us as a seemingly endless enumeration of facts (‘The Council of Europe was established in whenever’), numbers (‘The European Parliament has umpteen members’), abbreviations (‘IRO stands for whatever’) and generally incomprehensible phrases (‘Specialized agencies?’ Specialized in what? Agencies of and for whom?).

Indeed, leafing through the textbooks I had to read as a student, it becomes clear that general legal issues relating to international organizations had no priority. One of our textbooks addressed such issues, but in the part that was not compulsory reading for our exams.1 The other general textbook was more in the nature of a comparative review of internal provisions some organizations may have had in common, without emphasizing

1 This book was D. W. Bowett, The Law of International Institutions (4th edn, London, 1982). Recently, a new edition appeared: Philippe Sands & Pierre Klein, Bowett’s Law of International Institutions (London, 2001). Unfortunately, I received it too late to be able to do much with it.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to International Institutional Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • Table of Cases xix
  • A Note on Documentation xxxiii
  • Abbreviations xxxv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Rise of International Organizations 16
  • 3 - The Legal Position of International Organizations 42
  • 4 - The Foundations of Powers of Organizations 60
  • 5 - International Organizations and the Law of Treaties 82
  • 6 - Issues of Membership 104
  • 7 - Financing 128
  • 8 - Privileges and Immunities 146
  • 9 - Institutional Structures 169
  • 10 - Legal Instruments 197
  • 11 - Decision-Making and Judicial Review 226
  • 12 - Dispute Settlement 253
  • 13 - Treaty-Making by International Organizations 278
  • 14 - Issues of Responsibility 300
  • 15 - Dissolution and Succession 320
  • 16 - Concluding Remarks- Re-Appraising International Organizations 334
  • Bibliography 345
  • Index 373
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 399

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.