Romanticism, Maternity, and the Body Politic

By Julie Kipp | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION NATURALLY BAD OR DANGEROUSLY GOOD:
ROMANTIC-PERIOD MOTHERS “ON TRIAL”

1. Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (London: 1799), I:59.

2. Quoted in James Boswell, The Life of Johnson, ed. George Birkbeck (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964), V:226, note 2.

3. The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957), p. 32.

4. England in 1819. The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism (University of Chicago Press, 1998), pp. 203, 209–9.

5. See Toril Moi, Sexual/Textual Politics: Feminist Literary Theory (London: Methuen, 1985), pp. 50–67 for a good overview of early “woman-centered” feminist criticisms.

6. Cf. Butler’s Gender Trouble (London: Routledge, 1990). Butler’s critique of Julia Kristeva’s appeals to the maternal body, for example, centers on the assumption that the female body to which Kristeva refers is itself a construct produced by the very law she seeks to undermine (see especially pp. 81–98).

7. “The Laugh of the Medusa,” trans. Keith Cohen and Paula Cohen, in Critical Theory Since 1965, eds. Hazard Adams and Leroy Searle (Tallahassee: University Press of Florida, 1986), p. 312.

8. Susan Stanford Friedman, “Creativity and the Childbirth Metaphor: Gender Difference in Literary Discourse,” in Feminisms. An Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism, eds. Robyn R. Warhol and Diane Price Herndl (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1991), p. 390.

9. “Substitution,” in The Levinas Reader, ed. Sean Hand, trans. Alphonso Lingis (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989), pp. 94–95.

10. Sara Ruddick, “Thinking Mothers / Conceiving Birth,” in Representations of Motherhood, eds. Donna Bassin, Margaret Honey, and Merle Mahrer Kaplan (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994).

11. See Anne Mellor, Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters (New York: Routledge 1988), pp. 89–114, for a good analysis of these issues in Frankenstein.

12. Mary O’Brien, “State Power and Reproductive Freedom,” in Reproducing the World: Essays in Feminist Theory, ed. O’Brien (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1989), p. 24.

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