Romanticism, Maternity, and the Body Politic

By Julie Kipp | Go to book overview

Bibliography

PRIMARY SOURCES

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Bascom, Aaron. A Sermon: Preached at the Execution of Abiel Converse for the Murder of her Bastard Child. Northampton, 1788.

Beeton, Isabella. Every Day Cookery and Housekeeping Book. London: Ward, Lock & Co., n.d.

Boswell, James. The Life of Johnson. 2nd edn. Ed. George Birkbeck. 6 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964.

Brownlow, John. Memoranda; or, Chronicles of the Foundling Hospital. London, 1847.

Burke, Edmund. On the Sublime and Beautiful (1757). The Harvard Classics: Edmund Burke. Ed. Charles Eliot. Danbury, CT: Grolier Enterprises, 1980. 27–140.

Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790). Reflections on the Revolution in
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Tracts Relative to the Laws against Popery in Ireland (1765). Works of the Right
Honourable Edmund Burke
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Cadogan, William. An Essay Upon Nursing and the Management of Children from Their Birth to Three Years of Age. 10th edn. London, 1772.

Chamberlen, Hugh. “The Translator to the Reader,” in Mauriceau, Francis, The Diseases of Women with Child, And in Childbed: As also the best Means of helping them in Natural and Unnatural Labours (1688). 3rd edn. Trans. Hugh Chamberlen. London, 1697.

Chamblit, Rebekah. “The Declaration, Dying Warning and Advice of Rebekah Chamblit.” Boston, 1733.

Clinton, Elizabeth, Countess of Lincoln. The Countesse of Lincoln’s Nurserie. Oxford, 1622.

Cummin, William. The Proofs of Infanticide Considered: Including Dr. Hunter’s Tract on Child Murder, With Illustrative Notes; And a Summery of the

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