Disinformation: American Multinationals at War against Europe

By Rémi Kauffer | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Our world has changed. From simple and Manichean, it has become complicated, ambiguous. Yesterday, there were two systems competing, bloc against bloc. Now there is only one superpower. Sure of its geo-economic supremacy, the United States confronts two lesshomogeneous entities, the European Union and Asia, that immense and chaotic continent.

This is not the end of History; it is only the beginning of a new chapter. A page has been turned. Nothing will be the same as before, but what will it be like, this century that is just starting out? The broad outlines of force are being drawn, through industrial, technological and commercial confrontations that will continue to intensify between nations as well as between great international companies. The American penchant for hegemony is growing. The future of our societies will depend to a great extent on Europe’s capacity to thwart this new world disorder. This is what is at stake: a world under one influence, or indeed a multi-polar, balanced planet. And even though many have already laid down their arms, the show isn’t over — yet. In Europe as in America, we like suspense…

-3-

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Disinformation: American Multinationals at War against Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter One - In a Burmese Mud Hole 9
  • Chapter 2 - Frogs, Go Home! 41
  • Chapter 3 - The Great Drug War 67
  • Chapter 4 - Uncle Sam’s Pharmacists 97
  • Chapter 5 - Low Blows at High Altitude 127
  • Chapter 6 - Duel of the Giants in the Sky 155
  • Chapter 7 - Ecologists and Consumers, the New Battlegrounds 187
  • Conclusion 217
  • Acknowledgements and Bibliographical Sources 225
  • Also from Algora Publishing 237
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