California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State

By Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

Monterey

Railroad Stations: N. end of Adams St. for Southern Pacific Lines.

Bus Stations: Franklin and Pacific Sts. for Pacific Greyhound Lines; 216 Del Monte Ave. for Burlington Trailways.

Airport: Community Airport, 3 m. E., off Monterey-Salinas Highway, taxi $1, time 15 min.; special week-end service to San Francisco.

Taxis: 15¢ first ¼ m., 10¢ each additional 1/3 m.

Busses: To Oak Grove 5¢, Del Monte 5¢, Asilomar 10¢, Pacific Grove 10¢, Carmel 25¢.

Traffic Regulations: Pedestrians have right-of-way at all street crossings.

Accommodations: 13 hotels.

Information Service: Hotel Del Monte; Chamber of Commerce, 585 Munras St.; California State Auto Assn., 520 Fremont St.

Radio Stations: KDON (1210 kc).

Theaters and Motion Picture Houses: First Theater, Scott and Pacific Sts., occasional plays; two motion picture houses.

Tennis: Monterey High School courts, S. end of Larkin St., open to public. Swimming: Surf swimming at beaches in environs; Monterey High School pool, S. end of Larkin St., free.

Riding: 10 miles of beach; 200 miles of forest trails near Monterey, rates from $1 per hour.

Hunting: Los Padres National Forest, 32.2 m., deer, boar, rabbit, quail, dove, and pigeon; Forest Service regulations.

Fishing: Fresh water fishing in nearby rivers; surf fishing: Monterey Bay, Pacific Grove, Carmel Bay and below Carmel; deep sea: boat rentals at Fisherman’s Wharf, N. end of Main St., 50¢ per hour and up.

Annual Events: Birthday Party, commemorative pageants, June 3; Flower Show, June; County Fair, Sept.; Blessing of the Fleet, Sept.

MONTEREY (0-600 alt., 9,141 pop.), lies on sloping shores at the southern end of Monterey Bay, within the northward curve of Point Pinos, which protects the harbor from heavy seas and high winds.

Richard Henry Dana, arriving at Monterey on the brig Pilgrim in 1834, thought the town made a “very pretty appearance” with its redroofed, white stucco houses, the white sand beach, green pines, and deep blue bay. The city gives the same impression today.

To the north the shore sweeps in a curving line toward Santa Cruz. To the east are the convolutions of the Santa Lucia Range, covered with oak and pine, beyond which rise the bare heights of the Gabilan Range. The near hills and pines of Point Pinos block the view to the south, where the coast abruptly changes to stone crags topped with weirdly-shaped trees, and small deep coves and sheltered beaches. Monterey cypress along the shoreline and Monterey pine, both named for the city, are indigenous to a limited area in the vicinity.

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California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xiii
  • General Information xv
  • Calendar of Events xix
  • A Guide to Recreation xxi
  • Preface 1939 xxix
  • Editorial Staff xxxi
  • Introduction xxxiii
  • Part I - California- From Past to Present 1
  • El Dorado Up to Date 3
  • Natural Setting and Conservation 8
  • The First Californians 33
  • California’s Last Four Centuries 41
  • Riches from the Soil 66
  • Industry and Finance 79
  • From Clipper Ship to Clipper Plane 87
  • Workingmen 95
  • Press and Radio 109
  • The Movies 120
  • Education 131
  • The Arts 139
  • Architecture 167
  • Part II - Signposts to City Scenes 177
  • Berkeley 179
  • Fresno 188
  • Hollywood 192
  • Long Beach 201
  • Los Angeles 206
  • Monterey 230
  • Oakland 237
  • Pasadena 245
  • Sacramento 250
  • San Diego 258
  • San Francisco 265
  • San Jose 298
  • Santa Barbara 304
  • Stockton 311
  • Part III - Up and Down the State 315
  • Tour 1 317
  • Death Valley National Monument 645
  • Sequoia and General Grant National Parks 655
  • Yosemite National Park 667
  • Golden Gate International Exposition 680
  • Part IV - Appendices 685
  • Chronology 687
  • A Select Reading List of California Books 694
  • Index 699
  • Agriculture *
  • Education *
  • Cities I *
  • Cities II *
  • History *
  • Industry; Commerce and Transportation *
  • Architecture *
  • The Natural Setting *
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