California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State

By Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

Stockton

Railroad Stations: E. Weber Ave. and Sacramento St. for Southern Pacific R.R.; San Joaquin and Taylor Sts. for Santa Fe R.R.; Main and Union Sts. for Western Pacific R.R.

Bus Stations: 227 N. Hunter St. for Pacific Greyhound; 27 E. Weber Ave. for Byron and Brentwood; 245 N. Hunter St. for River Auto Stages.

Airport: Stockton Airport, 5 m. SE. on Sharp’s Lane, private planes only.

Streetcars: Fare 7¢, 4 tokens for 25¢; free transfers.

Accommodations: 88 hotels; 4 tourist camps.

Information Service: California State Auto Assn. (AAA), 929 N. El Dorado St.; Chamber of Commerce, 234 N. El Dorado St.

Radio Stations: KGDM (1100 kc.); KWG (1200 kc).

Motion Picture Houses: Seven.

Golf: Stockton Municipal Golf Course, 7th St. and Sharp Lane. 9 holes; 50¢, 75¢ Sat. and Sun.; monthly tickets $3; children 25¢ weekdays.

Tennis: 10 municipal courts, Oak Park, Victory Park, Municipal Baths, Arbor Park; all free.

Swimming Pools: Stockton Municipal Baths, S. end of S. San Joaquin St.; open 9-5, 20¢, children 10¢, suit and towel 10¢; American Legion Park Lake, 1400

N. Baker St., free; lifeguards in summer.

Riding: Bridle paths around Municipal Golf Course and in Louis Park; horses 75¢ an hour.

Annual Events: Concerts by Stockton Symphony Orchestra, winter; Port Stockton Regatta and Water Carnival, May 30 and 31; San Joaquin County Fair, last full week of Aug.

STOCKTON (23 alt., 47,963 pop.), at the head of tidewaters on the San Joaquin River, has something of the appearance of a coastal city. Its northernmost section, campus of the College of the Pacific, borders the Calaveras River, which flows into the San Joaquin on the west. The Stockton Channel extends eastward from the San Joaquin, cutting through the city and stopping at its center. Other waterways wind in and around the city, among them the Mormon Channel, through the southern part of Stockton.

The 32-foot Stockton Channel—nucleus of the Port of Stockton— is the shipping point for agricultural products of the fertile San Joaquin Valley. A flotilla of barges and launches, the “Mosquito Fleet,” goes out from here, carrying to market the rich produce of the netherlands farms; huge ocean-going freighters ply the river from Stockton to San Francisco. The Port is the outstanding commercial feature of the city, and warehouses, factories, and mills line the Channel.

The business district radiates from Courthouse Plaza, Weber Avenue and Hunter Street. The tall office buildings, modern shops, metro

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California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xiii
  • General Information xv
  • Calendar of Events xix
  • A Guide to Recreation xxi
  • Preface 1939 xxix
  • Editorial Staff xxxi
  • Introduction xxxiii
  • Part I - California- From Past to Present 1
  • El Dorado Up to Date 3
  • Natural Setting and Conservation 8
  • The First Californians 33
  • California’s Last Four Centuries 41
  • Riches from the Soil 66
  • Industry and Finance 79
  • From Clipper Ship to Clipper Plane 87
  • Workingmen 95
  • Press and Radio 109
  • The Movies 120
  • Education 131
  • The Arts 139
  • Architecture 167
  • Part II - Signposts to City Scenes 177
  • Berkeley 179
  • Fresno 188
  • Hollywood 192
  • Long Beach 201
  • Los Angeles 206
  • Monterey 230
  • Oakland 237
  • Pasadena 245
  • Sacramento 250
  • San Diego 258
  • San Francisco 265
  • San Jose 298
  • Santa Barbara 304
  • Stockton 311
  • Part III - Up and Down the State 315
  • Tour 1 317
  • Death Valley National Monument 645
  • Sequoia and General Grant National Parks 655
  • Yosemite National Park 667
  • Golden Gate International Exposition 680
  • Part IV - Appendices 685
  • Chronology 687
  • A Select Reading List of California Books 694
  • Index 699
  • Agriculture *
  • Education *
  • Cities I *
  • Cities II *
  • History *
  • Industry; Commerce and Transportation *
  • Architecture *
  • The Natural Setting *
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