California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State

By Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

Chronology
1533Pilot Fortuno Ximenes discovers an “island” (Lower California) west of Mexico. Killed while trying to land.
1535May 5. Cortés lands where Ximenes was killed. Calls place Santa Cruz (possibly the later La Paz). Names the country California.
1539Francisco de Ulloa surveys both shores of “Sea of Cortés” (later Gulf of California); misses mouth of Colorado River, but discovers that Baja (Lower) California is a peninsula.
1540Hernando de Alarcón ascends gulf; discovers Colorado River. To contact him, Melchor Diaz traverses Arizona, and crosses Colorado River, near Yuma. He, or de Alarcón, first white man to set foot in Alta (Upper) California.
1542Sept. 28. Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo sails into San Diego Bay, which he names “San Miguel.”
1579June 15- Francis Drake enters Drake’s Bay; holds California’s first Christian service, and claims “Nova Albion” in the name of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth.
1602Nov. 10. Sebastián Vizcaino enters San Miguel Bay; renames it San Diego de Alcala. On Dec. 16 he anchors in Monterey Bay.
1697Jesuits, under Father Juan Maria Salvatierra, begin mission at Loreta—first permanent colony in Baja California.
1701Nov. 21. Father Eusebio Francisco Kino, Jesuit missionary, crosses southeastern corner of California, working among Indians of Pimeria Alta.
1767Carlos III, of Spain, issues decree banishing Jesuits from all Spanish colonies.
1768Father Junipero Serra, “patron saint of California,” arrives at Loredo, with 16 Franciscan monks. Jesuit missions in Lower California surrendered.
1769April. Two vessels arrive San Diego Bay, with supplies, to equip colony.
May-June. Settlers and soldiers under Gov. Gaspar de Portola, Capt. Fernando de Rivera y Moncada and Father Junipero Serra come overland from Lower California, with cattle. July 16. Father Serra blesses site of Misión San Diego de Alcala, first of 21 missions established in California within 54 years. Aug. 2. Portola camps at site of Los Angeles; continues northward in search of Monterey Bay, but, unaware, passes it, Oct. 2. José Artego, of advance guard, sights San Francisco Bay (Nov. 2), but expedition turns back, reaching San Diego Jan. 24, 1770.

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California in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the Golden State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xiii
  • General Information xv
  • Calendar of Events xix
  • A Guide to Recreation xxi
  • Preface 1939 xxix
  • Editorial Staff xxxi
  • Introduction xxxiii
  • Part I - California- From Past to Present 1
  • El Dorado Up to Date 3
  • Natural Setting and Conservation 8
  • The First Californians 33
  • California’s Last Four Centuries 41
  • Riches from the Soil 66
  • Industry and Finance 79
  • From Clipper Ship to Clipper Plane 87
  • Workingmen 95
  • Press and Radio 109
  • The Movies 120
  • Education 131
  • The Arts 139
  • Architecture 167
  • Part II - Signposts to City Scenes 177
  • Berkeley 179
  • Fresno 188
  • Hollywood 192
  • Long Beach 201
  • Los Angeles 206
  • Monterey 230
  • Oakland 237
  • Pasadena 245
  • Sacramento 250
  • San Diego 258
  • San Francisco 265
  • San Jose 298
  • Santa Barbara 304
  • Stockton 311
  • Part III - Up and Down the State 315
  • Tour 1 317
  • Death Valley National Monument 645
  • Sequoia and General Grant National Parks 655
  • Yosemite National Park 667
  • Golden Gate International Exposition 680
  • Part IV - Appendices 685
  • Chronology 687
  • A Select Reading List of California Books 694
  • Index 699
  • Agriculture *
  • Education *
  • Cities I *
  • Cities II *
  • History *
  • Industry; Commerce and Transportation *
  • Architecture *
  • The Natural Setting *
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